Windows 10 Event 10016 Fix: The application-specific permission settings do not grant Local Activation permission for the COM Server application with CLSID {D63B10C5-BB46-4990-A94F-E40B9D520160} and APPID {9CA88EE3-ACB7-47C8-AFC4-AB702511C276} to the user NT AUTHORITY\LOCAL SERVICE SID (S-1-5-19) from address LocalHost (Using LRPC) running in the application container Unavailable SID (Unavailable). This security permission can be modified using the Component Services administrative tool.I a

Ran into a lot of DCOM (DistributedCOM) errors on Windows 10 machines after upgrades.  Looks like the TrustedInstaller from a previous application and the RunTime Broker did not give System and Local Administrators permission during a Windows 10 upgrade.  It just an annoying thing but also slows down a windows 10 Login.

The Error

The application-specific permission settings do not grant Local Activation permission for the COM Server application with CLSID 
{D63B10C5-BB46-4990-A94F-E40B9D520160}
 and APPID 
{9CA88EE3-ACB7-47C8-AFC4-AB702511C276}
 to the user NT AUTHORITY\LOCAL SERVICE SID (S-1-5-19) from address LocalHost (Using LRPC) running in the application container Unavailable SID (Unavailable). This security permission can be modified using the Component Services administrative tool.

Background

It would appear that an application was installed on these machines at some point and that it did not do a proper install.  The W10 upgrade exacerbated the issue due to missing security accounts after a W10 upgrade.  The fix is to give local administrators and System rights to the DCOM.  To do this you have to modify permissions on two registry keys and then change the DCOM permissions.  Pretty easy to do.   That said, I am not sure any change is actually required.

FIX

Regedit Take Ownership

You will need to take ownership then set rights against two different keys.  The keys are:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AppID\{9CA88EE3-ACB7-47c8-AFC4-AB702511C276}
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{D63B10C5-BB46-4990-A94F-E40B9D520160}
  1. Open Regedit with Administrators privileges and navigate to the keys above (remember you have to do this twice)
    1. WinKey + X >> Command Prompt (Admin) >> Type in Regedit
  2. Right click the key >> permissions
  3. Click advanced
  4. At the top change the Owner to COMPUTERNAME\Administrators
    1. Please note if you are domain joined you’ll have to change where you are searching from to your local computer
  5. Look in the Permission Entries field
    1. If the local system administrators group is listed ensure it has full control
    2. if the administrators group is not listed add it and give it full control.  (note you can only do this if you are a member of the administrators group and it is now the owner)
  6. Click okay a lot >> Ensure you apply permissions to all child objects

Change DCOM Permissions

Need to ensure DCOM permissions are setup

  1. Open DCOMCNFG as an Administrator
    1. WinKey + X >> Command Prompt (Admin) >> Type in DCOMCNFG
  2. Navigate to Component Services >> Computers >> My Computer >> DCOM Config
  3. Find the RunTimeBroker  >> Right Click >> Properties >> Security Tab
  4. Launch and Activation Permissions >> Edit >> Add System and give it full control
    1. I also added the Administrators group just for testing

While changing permissions I was prompted several times to remove bad account references.  I did this as the computer knows which accounts have been removed.

Summary

At this point you should have sorted the DCOM errors.  Give your computer a reboot and away you can go.  Issue seems to reappear on install of new builds of Windows 10.

Reminder: I am not sure this fix is required.

96 Comments Add yours

  1. Les Ferguson says:

    Thanks, this is still applicable today (when many references to solutions in Microsoft support pages are broken).
    I have a few Apple tools installed as part of the Xamarin or Android build tools, are these likely to have been the cause?

    Like

    1. I have seen this error now for years caused by a great number of software rights. It does ZERO harm but it is curious.

      Like

      1. Sam Moss says:

        according to MicroShaft these Event ID 10016 errors are due to the settings for DCOM being now owned by M$ as they from build 1703 going forward have added themselves as a ‘User’ on most of the Windows 10 platforms. those errors are now (according to MicroShaft) benign and are intended to be generated as a security precaution and according to their statement on the subject, to be ignored. the DCOM service prior to 1703 could be disabled but that can no longer be done. there no longer is any way to ‘take ownership’ as in the past to rid these errors that are being generated. to me it is all about M$ doing the ‘Big Brother’ thing.

        Like

  2. Darrell says:

    Well, after numerous tries and fixes, even a complete reloading of Windows, I am right back where I started. After creating a lot of thumbnails, Windows Explorer will hang up and crash, then all thumbnails will be deleted. It is recorded as a 10016 error. I’ve tried turning off the occasional Windows maintenance that deletes thumbnails, tried the advice of this article, increased the thumbnail cache size. All to no avail. At the moment this problem appears to be unsolvable. Its the only really big problem I’ve had so far with Windows 10.

    Like

  3. Ken says:

    I have 2 RuntimeBroker and neither will allow a Security change. I am admin

    Liked by 2 people

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